Digital Content Warehouse Student Course Catalog

As part of the Open Education Resources movement, we have compiled a curated catalog of student courses to accelerate the implementation of blended learning in the classroom. 

 
 

Become a member today to receive access to these courses and a variety of other benefits.

 

Table of Contents

 

In addition to the below, an additional 60+ high school and middle school courses are going through the curation process and will soon be available.  Prioritization of this work is based on member demand, so let us know your thoughts!

High School and Middle School Course Offerings

 

AP Course Offerings

 

High School and Middle School Course Offerings

Biology

Credit: 1.0

Course Length: 1 Year

Over the course of the year Biology will cover the characteristics of living things and life processes. Semesters 1 and 2 include cell structure and function, genetics, evolution, microorganisms, fungi, plants, invertebrates, vertebrates, and physiology.

Civics            

Credit: 0.5

Course Length: 1 Semester

Prerequisite: None

All students will be future members of a democracy that can only exist with citizen participation. A strong foundation in the principles of American civics, including the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, is necessary to produce informed citizens capable of making responsible decisions and voting. As per the Colorado Academic Standards, this course provides a knowledge of the rules, rights, and responsibilities of citizens that helps to create a common political culture that furthers American ideals of democracy and equality. Successful completion of this course satisfies the Civil Government graduation requirement.

Computer Applications

Computer Applications Semester 1

Computer Applications Semester 1 is designed to familiarize students with computers and their applications. Students will learn the basics of Microsoft Office using focusing on word processing and the use of spreadsheets. Students will also learn how to validate information found on the Internet. The semester will finish with a look at Multimedia Presentations.

Computer Applications Semester 2

Computer Applications Semester 2 is designed to take students deeper into the use of computer applications. During this semester students will learn to write code using CodeAcademy. They will learn to create web pages using Kompozer. Students will take a brief look at computer graphics using Pixlr. Students will also learn to create a computer video game using Scratch. The semester will end with another look at coding using Code.org.

Earth Science

Credit 1.0

Course Length: 1 Year

Prerequisites: none

Students explore a variety of topics including astronomy, geologic history, tectonics, surface interactions, natural resources, climate, meteorology and cumulates with the study of natural hazards. This course meets the Colorado State Standards for Earth Systems Science and follows the BSCS 5E model as a best practice of instruction. Laboratory exercises include virtual simulations and hands on experiences with household items. It is recommended that students have access to a webcam and microphone to complete course projects.

Economics 101

Credit 1.0

Course Length: 1 Semester

This is a general economics course. The course allows the students to understand key economic concepts. The students will also analyze typical economic questions in the context of the everyday life of a young person. The course materials will provide all students exposure to key economic concepts and help build understanding of the relevance of economics in everyday life. Unit concepts include: scarcity and abundance; supply and demand; consumer and the firm; consumer vs. the firm; the national economy; and the tax and cost of living.

English 10

Credit 1.0

Course Length: 1 year

Prerequisite: None

English 10 is a year-long course that emphasizes the fundamental language skills of reading, writing, thinking, viewing, and presenting. An emphasis on vocabulary and composition skills is an on-going part of the class. Students refine their skills of written expression by writing  compare contrast, literary analysis, research, persuasive, and narrative essays. Students analyze important themes in classic and modern works of various literary genres including short story, novel, and non-fiction. Topics include author’s purpose and perspective, exploration of human motives and conflicts, the study of figurative, connotative, and technical vocabulary in context, literary devices, and the art of persuasion. The development of critical reading and writing skills is a major emphasis of the course.

English 11

Credit 1.0

Course Length: 1 year

Prerequisite: None

English 11 is a year-long course that emphasizes the development of an academic persona to further students skills in reading, writing, analyzing, interpreting, viewing, synthesizing, and presenting.  The students will explore a variety of strategies to effectively interpret, evaluate, and synthesize meaning through analyzing various literary theories throughout several time periods with the purpose of creating more sophisticated readers, thinkers, and writers.  Students will analyze texts and media for advanced rhetorical strategies, fallacies, logic, and arrangement to eventually apply to national issues using each of these devices through written and oral presentations.  Using advanced and sophisticated strategies in premises, purposes, and propositions in a variety of works, students will analyze and implement argumentation methods by justifying and documenting evidence and presenting the arguments effectively to an authentic audience.  The development of sophisticated interpreters, readers, writers, and oral conveyors is emphasized throughout the course.

Health Semester

Credit 0.5

Course Length: 1 semester

Health is a semester long course earning students .5 credits while addressing the Colorado Health Education Standards: Physical & Personal Wellness, Emotional and Social Wellness, Prevention & Risk Management. Students will explore health as a holistic concept and the interconnection between one’s mental, social, physical and emotional health and others. Students will learn how to set personal goals. They will learn to evaluate and analyze situations and resources to help make healthy decisions in regards to lifelong health and wellness.  They will analyze their current diets and the many influences on food choice.  Students will explore healthy relationships. They will address the consequences and effects of use/non-use of alcohol, tobacco and other drugs. Students will also work on communication and refusal skills in relationship to personal safety and violence prevention and awareness. Students will be assessed in a variety of modes including:  self-checks/reflections, interactive quizzes, projects, exams, written assignments and participation in classroom discussions.

Journalism Semester

Credit 0.5

Term: 1 Year

Journalism is a semester course designed for students interested in newspaper journalism and developing their skills as a writer. The course explores the contemporary media and the ethical responsibility issues inherent in the press today. Students will learn the fundamentals of news, feature, and editorial writing. Copy reading, news style and editing will be stressed. Students will create numerous original stories using varied structures and writing techniques. Much of the course will focus on the students developing and improving their writing in a variety of styles and formats. Voice, tone, syntax, vocabulary, structure, and editing techniques will all be addressed.

Modern US History

Credit 1.0

Term: 1 Year

Prerequisite: None

This course addresses the social, economic, political, and military aspects of the United States from the Progressive Era (1890’s) to the present. Through exploration of recurring American issues and significant themes, students will examine contacts and exchanges among groups and cultures and how these have influenced American perspectives. Using important events, students will formulate historical questions, evaluate sources and data using diverse viewpoints, hypothesize, draw conclusions, and analyze issues of the American experience.

Psychology

Credit: 1.0

Term: 1 Year

Prerequisite: None

Due to the complexity of modern society and the many options facing each individual, students can use knowledge of psychology to better understand themselves and their relationship to others. Through a study of psychology, students will learn to maximize their full potential, make appropriate decisions based on self-awareness, and better cope with life situations. This course meets Colorado Academic Standards for Social Studies.

 

AP Course Offerings

 

AP Physics 1

Term: 1 Year

AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits.

AP Environmental Science

Term: 1 Year

The AP Environmental Science course is the equivalent of a one-semester, introductory college course in environmental science, through which students engage with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world. The course requires that students identify and analyze natural and human-made environmental problems, evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them. Environmental science is interdisciplinary, embracing topics from geology, biology, environmental studies, environmental science, chemistry, and geography.

AP Calculus AB

Term: 1 Year

Building enduring mathematical understanding requires understanding the why and how of mathematics in addition to mastering the necessary procedures and skills. To foster this deeper level of learning, AP Calculus AB is designed to develop mathematical knowledge conceptually, guiding you to connect topics and representations throughout the course and to apply strategies and techniques to accurately solve diverse types of problems.

AP Calculus BC

Term: 1 Year

AP Calculus BC is roughly equivalent to both first and second semester college calculus courses and extends the content learned in AB to different types of equations and introduces the topic of sequences and series. The AP course covers topics in differential and integral calculus, including concepts and skills of limits, derivatives, definite integrals, the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus, and series. The course teaches students to approach calculus concepts and problems when they are represented graphically, numerically, analytically, and verbally, and to make connections amongst these representations. Students learn how to use technology to help solve problems, experiment, interpret results, and support conclusions.